Bravehearts

genderfuckThe term transgender was coined in the 1970s by Virginia Prince in the USA, as a contrast with the term ‘transsexual,’ to refer to someone who does not desire surgical intervention to ‘change sex,’ and/or who believes that they fall ‘between’ genders, not identifying fully, or strictly, as either male or female.’

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transgender

Even that I’m used to the term Transgender, I was surprised by terms like Cross-dressing, Bravehearts and Genderfuck. I found them when I tried find information about mens in skirts or dress that is usually considered as feminine. I have for a long time strange feeling about the male macho sexuality especially about dress rules, determining which kind of gender you are. I felt that transsexualism is not a term for me. I fell neither like a macho man nor like someone who fits to the concept which is as globally understood as transsexualism.

Historic figures were often unable to identify themselves as homosexual, transgender, transsexual, or transvestite because these classifications simply had no names or social recognition in their era.’

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross-dressing

I don’t see why women may wear pants and jackets but men mustn’t wear skirts or feminine lika dress. I created a term for me I call it Maleism. This term represents my response to feninism. The idea is that these could like their feminist conterparts express their freedom of expression.

This topic is still quite taboo, mostly because most men push themselves in the social ‘men’ role that they are not able to step over this border.

Societies norms are such absurd that they would label a man gay if he seeks a support from another man or feeble-minded if he seeks support from another woman.’

http://politicalgender.blogspot.com/2005/11/feminism-vs-maleism.html

When only a few women in the West wore trousers, women in trousers were considered to be cross-dressing. As more women began to wear trousers, the style gained mainstream social acceptance. Trousers are now no longer considered for men only.’

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross-dressing

Now that women in Western society have won the right to wear whatever they want, what justification remains for a rule that arbitrarily restricts men to wearing trousers’ Trousers no longer distinguish men from women. We don’t routinely ride horseback any more.

However, after a few years, the boy learns that society has other plans for him. Society needs men who are tough, aggressive, and fearless: men who can endure pain and obey orders without complaint; men who will do the dirty, dangerous jobs that must be done; men who will be ready to kill in battle, or to charge up a hill into withering machine-gun fire without regard to personal safety. Society puts little value on sissies, wimps, and momma’s boys. ‘

http://www.kiltmen.com

Until this day I felt like I was fighting against windmills. Usually I don’t like limiting terms but I realized that a description of this issue makes me feel more restful. I’m not as alone alone as before. Now I know More and I found links and people with a similar thinking and interest which helps me in finding ways to react in my life. Looking back into my life you could see similarities in world history and in my personal life. As a teenager I resisted to kiss the dust, and I revolted with long hair as people did in 60’s, now I resist playing a social male role and instead I’m trying to wear what I want, do what I like, and live as I feel. I’m trying to resist.

Here is something for the muse.

Joan of Arc was burned at the stake upon being convicted by a religious court, with the act of dressing in male clothing being cited as one of the principal reasons for her execution.’

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross-dressing

statement:

For many the need to crossdress becomes a part of the self, just as musicians need to play music, writers need to write, or ballplayers need to play ball. A life without crossgender expression is to some as tragic as the life of a musician forced to live without music. Like musical talent, crossgender expression can be a real gift.’

http://www.tri-ess.org/cd01.html

links:

hair:

people in history:

feminism:

art-practice:

shops:

community: